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Tuesday Morning - November 30, 2010

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November 30, 2010

Table of Contents

House Likely to Vote on Child Nutrition Reauthorization This Week

Report Card Shows Americans Not Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables

Let’s Get Cooking! Recipe Competition Deadline Only Five Weeks Away!

Bread for the World Releases Report on World Hunger

Study Finds School Lunch Programs Might Break Cycle of Poverty

SNA Legislative Action Center

Legislative Toolkit

House Likely to Vote on Child Nutrition Reauthorization This Week

The House of Representatives is expected to take action on Child Nutrition Reauthorization this week, with a vote coming as early as today. Please contact your Member of Congress TODAY and ask them to vote for S. 3307, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Click this link to access a sample action alert email that can be sent: http://capwiz.com/asfsa/issues/alert/?alertid=15185161.  To call your Representative, dial 1-877-698-8228 and enter in your zip code.

SNA, along with 1,350 other groups sent a letter to the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Education and Labor Committee on Monday, November 29th. The letter, addressed to Chairman George Miller (D-Calif.) and Ranking Member John Kline (R-Minn.), calls on the House of Representatives to pass S. 3307. The letter also asks Congress to restore funding to the SNAP program that was used to pay for improvements in S. 3307.

Please click on the link below to view a copy of the letter.

 CNR Sign-On Letter  (pdf)

Report Card Shows Americans Not Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables

A new report card from the National Fruit and Vegetable Alliance finds that the average American consumes fewer than the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, daily. According to the report card, only 6 percent of Americans eat the recommended amount of vegetables and only 8 percent meet the recommended target for fruits. The report card gave the school nutrition programs a “C” for making slight progress over the past several years in increasing the availability and variety of fruits and vegetables. The report card also recommends that schools continue to increase access to fruits and vegetables.

The report card evaluates the progress made on the National Fruit and Vegetable Alliance’s 2010 National Action Plan. Along with schools, restaurants, communities and other government food assistance programs were evaluated.

2010 National Action Plan

Let’s Get Cooking! Recipe Competition Deadline Only Five Weeks Away!

There are only 5 more weeks to submit a recipe for the Let’s Move! Recipes for Healthy Kids competition! School nutrition professionals, chefs, students, parents and interested community members are challenged to create exciting new recipes for school lunch programs across the country. Teams must create a healthy recipe in one of three categories: whole grains, dark green and orange vegetables, or dry beans and peas. Winning teams will receive up to a $3,000 prize and will be invited to prepare their recipes alongside White House chefs.

The deadline for entries is December 30, 2010, so submit your recipes today! To learn more about the contest, and the rules and regulations, check out this link: http://www.recipesforkidschallenge.com/

Bread for the World Releases Report on World Hunger

Bread for the World released a report last week focusing on global hunger and malnutrition. Our Common Interest: Ending Hunger and Malnutrition looks at the world response to the dramatic surge in world hunger following the spike in food prices in 2007-2008. The report takes a look at how the United States has responded to the global food crisis and how it is driving international action. The report also offers recommendations on how the United States can continue to be a leader in the fight against global hunger.

To read the complete copy of the report, please visit the link below.
Our Common Interest: Ending Hunger and Malnutrition

Study Finds School Lunch Programs Might Break Cycle of Poverty

A new study published in the journal Pediatrics has found that school meal programs aimed at reducing food insecurity can help break the cycle of poverty. According to researchers, food insecurity undercuts academic achievement by depriving the body of necessary nutrients. It also creates an atmosphere of stress and uncertainty that causes the student to lose interest in school. The study researchers surveyed students at Quebec, Canada high schools. They found that of the students who were from food insecure households, those that had access to school meals performed better academically than students who did not have access to school meals.

School lunch programs might break poverty cycle - Reuters


 
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